Latest from Multi News Outlets

Browsing Tag

hiring

Experts debate benefits of quiet hiring: ‘Temporary solution,’ ‘nothing new about…

The Progress Agents LLC CEO Dean Lindsay argues helping quiet quitting comes down to 'internalized reasons.' Less than a year after TikTok made "quiet quitting" famous, a new trend is gaining momentum on LinkedIn and Twitter. Known as "quiet hiring," the term has divided business leaders and HR pros, with some arguing that it will help workers negotiate for higher pay and benefits.  "Quiet hiring" is when a business retrains its workers and gives them new skills to fill in gaps in a business, often caused by labor shortages. Another critical part of quiet hiring includes hiring short-term talent, like contractors, to fill a pressing need, Harvard Business professor Joseph Fuller told Fox News Digital.But Twitter users were largely negative on the new trend, arguing that it struck too close to "quiet quitting," a trend that dominated headlines in 2022.  AS GEN Z OPTS OUT OF BLUE-COLLAR WORK IN AMERICA, EXPERT SHARES BENEFITS OF LEARNING A TRADE One HR expert telling Fox News Digital that quiet hiring was an opportunity for workers to negotiate for higher pay and benefits.  (iStock / iStock)The New School senior fellow Nina Turner wrote that quiet hiring was a way to describe employers taking advantage of workers. "Apparently, quiet hiring is when a company asks existing employees to do more than one job without a raise in pay. If your company starts quiet hiring, it’s time to quiet organize."Atlantic staff writer Derek Thompson said that it was another phrase created to describe a normal phenomenon in the work world. "In 2022, we had to invent the phrase ‘quiet quitting’ to describe workers adequately doing their job, so in 2023 we have to invent a phrase ‘quiet hiring’ to describe managers adequately doing their job."But experts were more divided on the trend, with one HR expert telling Fox News Digital that quiet hiring was an opportunity for workers to negotiate for higher pay and benefits. That's because if a business asks employees to take on new responsibilities, they will be "compensated" for it, Gartner "Future of Work" expert Emily Rose McRae told Fox News Digital."It might be more pay, it might be a one-time bonus, it might be an automatic bump up during performance review time," she said. "It might be more PTO, it could be a more flexible schedule." Quiet hiring without compensating workers was one of the biggest misunderstandings around quiet hiring, McRae said."Quiet hiring is adding more skills and abilities without adding more headcount. But that doesn’t mean you don’t compensate them."  In other words, many companies are facing a talent shortage, and one way to alleviate that is to either hire short contract workers or retrain workers within an organization to do new jobs.  -->BLUNT HIRING AD AT BUTCHER SHOP PROMPTS EMPLOYERS TO SHARE WILD EMPLOYEE EXCUSES: ‘MY CAT JUST HAD PUPPIES'The bottom line, McRae said, is that quiet hiring offers current employees leverage in negotiations with employers. She also-->…

Trouble filling a job? Look at hiring someone with a criminal record, HR pro says

FOX Business' Hillary Vaughn reports on a new study that found existing unemployment benefits helped fuel a labor downturn. The tight labor market is fueling a renewed push for U.S. companies to loosen their rules about hiring and consider more applicants with criminal records to fill open positions.  While an increasing number of companies say they are receptive to the idea, many still have major reservations. And that is something the world's largest human resources organization wants to change. Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., president and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management-->Johnny Taylor Jr, president and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management, has been on a mission for years, urging U.S. employers to stop overlooking folks with criminal records in their hiring. He argued in a FOX Business op-ed-->…